CIO WaterCooler Blog

Why It’s Critical For Leaders To Build Strong Personal Brands

 

Can you be an effective leader without building a strong personal brand? A renewed focus on your personal brand might be just the thing to inspire you to greater heights in your leadership.

As technology and workplace continues to go mobile, modern life seems to be pushing us to compete more than ever, making it critical for us to differentiate ourselves, in order to reach our goals. And expectations are even greater for leaders to be out in front of all these market forces, to provide their vision and advice for others to move forward. So a strong personal brand seems to be a critical feature of leadership development. Leaders must develop their image consciously continue to invest in their brand and themselves, so that they can effectively serve the company and communities that they lead.

The Death of the Performance Review: Why Personal Branding Matters More Than Ever

 

Last year Accenture, among others, decided to cut the cord, and eliminate annual performance reviews. Plenty of pundits have weighed in on this being a good idea, with only a few people saying that it could cause some serious problems for the giant consulting company or others who have started to follow the trend.

It does seem to make logical sense that providing more regular feedback throughout the year would be a better way to manage employees, determine performance, and set up rewards. Most articles covering the big shift argue that the current systems in place tend to cost the companies a lot of money and don’t tend to get the results that they want, i.e., better managed performance.

Digital transformation

The two faces of digital transformation

Some pundits think digital transformation is yesterday’s news. Here’s why they’re wrong.

It’s fashionable among some professional technology pundits and futurists to complain “Why are CXOs are still talking about ‘digital’ and digital transformation? This is yesterday’s news.” The new shiny thing has now shifted somewhere else – digital is just part of the landscape now, right?

Unfortunately, no, that’s BS. Anyone who’s telling you this isn’t living in the real world – they’re living in an echo-chamber populated solely by other pundits.

So why isn’t this all done and wrapped up with a nice bow?

A big part of the reason is that many, many organisations are still figuring out what ‘digital’ means for them, and secondarily what digital transformation means – so they can start to make practical plans. But the answer to the former question is very context-specific, and the answer to the latter question is also multi-faceted.

Providing IT on the CHEAP?

CIO to CRO – Chief Revolution Officer?

Thankfully, in this age of “build ‘em up, knock ‘em down” business models, where organisations have to keep a weather eye on the market and potentially disruptive new entrants (what price “Porter’s Five Forces Model” these days?) at a massively increased pace over even ten years ago, we now see IT in its true light – strategic driver.

I don’t want to wander into the world of “DevOps” in this little missive. I’m more interested in how the world of the CIO has changed through various phases:

Board-level ‘glorified IT Manager’
Board-level executive with responsibility for anything which is touched by a computer
Board-level interface between peers and the IT function
Soon-to-be-replaced-by-Chief Marketing Office Board member
Chief Revolution Officer
This has gone through an increasing wave of responsibility, through a minor hiccup to the point now where the role of a CIO is becoming more entrepreneurial and a key driver of the business. The CIO holds the “keys to the kingdom” in terms of a panoramic view of what is available in the IT and services market and the team which can be managed, directed, coerced or pushed towards delivering the new orthodoxy in a business.