CIO WaterCooler Blog

Hubble, Bubble, Tablet & Trouble

Take one laptop, add a pinch of tablet (any flavour), smart phone and wearable, and simmer gently adding liberal sprinkle of home device as required. Serve on a bed of self-regulation, et voila; Trouble is served!

And so begins the normal route to what some would call a mobile strategy. Except this isn’t anything of the sort. It isn’t a strategy but rather a hotch-potch of technologies loosely cobbled together with no concept of the complete picture, nor what is actually being achieved.

Most modern enterprises have a need for varying numbers of their staff to be mobile. Presenting to clients, travelling to different offices, working from home, working on the move, as part of a flexible working program, present in a meeting room, working in a common space in the office or taking notes at a conference. The truism that ‘work is something we do, not someplace we go’ has never been more relevant.

There are many enablers for this trend, but the main one is that we are all being asked to do more, in the same amount of time, with a broader group of people, and with the traditional millstone of ‘place’ gradually being cut free.

Don’t Be an Ostrich: Cloud Makes Software Your Competitive Advantage | 10th Magnitude

Cloud Back in 2010, our premise was that cloud was going to change the world because it would allow us to build cool custom software for companies that couldn’t have afforded it before: we would economically build and operate low-risk custom SaaS applications in the cloud. That was a software-powered world, 2010 style.

Conversations with a CIO – Adapt to the local culture

cio insight My previous three blogs on conversations with a CIO have prompted a number of comments about CIO culture, language and location. Various readers responded with comments such as, “we are different here in Spain, France, etc.” Others commented on relationship barriers due to language and/or culture differences.  In addition, there were a variety of sweeping uninformed statements making stereotypical assumptions about differences in how European CIOs behave and make decisions – things like Southern European CIOs tend to be late to meetings and gesticulate excessively, whilst Northern European CIOs tend to speak English (over and above their native language) and are exceedingly punctual with no strict hierarchies between employees and management.  And of course the British are unique with their stiff-upper lip conservative nature, structured and methodical at all times.

How easy it is to stereotype people when you don’t bother to understand them – and worse, to act on those stereotypes.

What color will be your legacy?

There are a ton of business books published every year that describe how to lead, how to develop strategy, how to build companies that last, some that are good, some that are great and a few that are memorable. But nothing like a book that I had been meaning to read for a long time and just finished. Walter Isaacson’s biography of that mercurial, volatile, charismatic, reviled by some, loved by some and respected by all builder of the most valuable company in the world, “Steve Jobs”, rates up there among one of the best business books I have read. I realize now after reading this book, how I, as billions of other people on this planet, came to assimilate the genius of his thinking and evolve into a household that has adopted all Apple devices and a has become a long term investor in its shares. And to add a personal note, I was also happy to read of the impact that India had on him from his teenage days, in separating the essential from the superfluous, in his unique design philosophy.