Category: CIO WaterCooler

Lost in Translation: Why EA Teams Must Speak the Language of Business

Sometimes, perception is reality. Consider your Enterprise Architecture (EA) team – respected for their technical savvy, the EA team makes sure IT systems run smoothly so the business can rapidly implement new strategies.

EA teams play a critical role in achieving alignment between technology and the business. Yet, too often, there is an awareness gap that keeps the EA team from their full potential.

According to a recent IDG survey, EA teams evaluate emerging trends from a technology standpoint, not a business perspective. The good news is four out of five IT decision-makers believe their EA team is completely capable of delivering valuable technical subject matter expertise and strategic thinking.

Too many Chiefs and too few Injun’s?

I found this note in my Evernote after attending the MIT-CIO event. For IT professionals I recommend attending this event alternate years (not much changes year to year I think) if not for anything else but to hear Andrew McAfee, one of the more entertaining and brilliant academics I have met. Anyway among the topics for discussion was the developing relationship paradigm between Chief Information Officers and Chief Marketing Officers and the race for resources between them. One speaker commented that this is becoming an even more important relationship than the one with the CFO.

Why It’s Critical For Leaders To Build Strong Personal Brands

 

Can you be an effective leader without building a strong personal brand? A renewed focus on your personal brand might be just the thing to inspire you to greater heights in your leadership.

As technology and workplace continues to go mobile, modern life seems to be pushing us to compete more than ever, making it critical for us to differentiate ourselves, in order to reach our goals. And expectations are even greater for leaders to be out in front of all these market forces, to provide their vision and advice for others to move forward. So a strong personal brand seems to be a critical feature of leadership development. Leaders must develop their image consciously continue to invest in their brand and themselves, so that they can effectively serve the company and communities that they lead.

Providing IT on the CHEAP?

CIO to CRO – Chief Revolution Officer?

Thankfully, in this age of “build ‘em up, knock ‘em down” business models, where organisations have to keep a weather eye on the market and potentially disruptive new entrants (what price “Porter’s Five Forces Model” these days?) at a massively increased pace over even ten years ago, we now see IT in its true light – strategic driver.

I don’t want to wander into the world of “DevOps” in this little missive. I’m more interested in how the world of the CIO has changed through various phases:

Board-level ‘glorified IT Manager’
Board-level executive with responsibility for anything which is touched by a computer
Board-level interface between peers and the IT function
Soon-to-be-replaced-by-Chief Marketing Office Board member
Chief Revolution Officer
This has gone through an increasing wave of responsibility, through a minor hiccup to the point now where the role of a CIO is becoming more entrepreneurial and a key driver of the business. The CIO holds the “keys to the kingdom” in terms of a panoramic view of what is available in the IT and services market and the team which can be managed, directed, coerced or pushed towards delivering the new orthodoxy in a business.