Category: CIO WaterCooler

Providing IT on the CHEAP?

CIO to CRO – Chief Revolution Officer?

Thankfully, in this age of “build ‘em up, knock ‘em down” business models, where organisations have to keep a weather eye on the market and potentially disruptive new entrants (what price “Porter’s Five Forces Model” these days?) at a massively increased pace over even ten years ago, we now see IT in its true light – strategic driver.

I don’t want to wander into the world of “DevOps” in this little missive. I’m more interested in how the world of the CIO has changed through various phases:

Board-level ‘glorified IT Manager’
Board-level executive with responsibility for anything which is touched by a computer
Board-level interface between peers and the IT function
Soon-to-be-replaced-by-Chief Marketing Office Board member
Chief Revolution Officer
This has gone through an increasing wave of responsibility, through a minor hiccup to the point now where the role of a CIO is becoming more entrepreneurial and a key driver of the business. The CIO holds the “keys to the kingdom” in terms of a panoramic view of what is available in the IT and services market and the team which can be managed, directed, coerced or pushed towards delivering the new orthodoxy in a business.

CIOs: Replace your 5-Year IT Plan with a 500-day Software Defined Plan

Software Defined NetworkingIT strategic planning – the next 5 years or 500 days?

A number of discussions arose from my last blog series on CIO Dialogues regarding the future of business IT Strategies both in the private and public sectors. Many CIOs raised concerns about disruptive technologies (in particular Software Defined “things”) are changing the CIO role and its ability to continuously provide the right, effective services back to the business.  It is apparent that no matter in what industry you are in, everything is moving at a faster pace than ever before – and with less predictability.  Consequently, CIO’s can no longer develop their traditional five-year IT plans and be relatively safe in their “predictions.”   Today they need to move faster than ever whilst ensuring a stable technological infrastructure for their business.  This means they can only think in terms of “near-future IT strategies” – 12-18 months maximum (about 500 days).

Don’t Be an Ostrich: Cloud Makes Software Your Competitive Advantage | 10th Magnitude

Cloud Back in 2010, our premise was that cloud was going to change the world because it would allow us to build cool custom software for companies that couldn’t have afforded it before: we would economically build and operate low-risk custom SaaS applications in the cloud. That was a software-powered world, 2010 style.

Conversations with a CIO – Adapt to the local culture

cio insight My previous three blogs on conversations with a CIO have prompted a number of comments about CIO culture, language and location. Various readers responded with comments such as, “we are different here in Spain, France, etc.” Others commented on relationship barriers due to language and/or culture differences.  In addition, there were a variety of sweeping uninformed statements making stereotypical assumptions about differences in how European CIOs behave and make decisions – things like Southern European CIOs tend to be late to meetings and gesticulate excessively, whilst Northern European CIOs tend to speak English (over and above their native language) and are exceedingly punctual with no strict hierarchies between employees and management.  And of course the British are unique with their stiff-upper lip conservative nature, structured and methodical at all times.

How easy it is to stereotype people when you don’t bother to understand them – and worse, to act on those stereotypes.